How to Use Full Length Test Simulations on DAT Bootcamp

One of the best ways to tell if you’re ready to take the DAT is to simulate the entire 5 hour DAT exam experience.

You’ll find out what areas you still need to focus on, get an estimated score, and build your test taking stamina. It’s also nice to familiarize yourself with how the DAT looks on the computer so there are no surprises on test day.

So how many full length tests should you do?

Each full length takes almost 5 hours to complete, and can take as long or longer to review, so it isn’t practical to take a ton of them. I recommend leaving the full length tests to the end of your study schedule, and only doing a few.

When you’re starting your study schedule, take individual practice tests (ex. Biology test 1), and not full length tests. This way you can focus on one section at a time, before trying to tackle the whole thing. Once you have studied everything and are ready to simulate the full DAT, then I recommend switching to full length tests, usually around test 6.

Most students take at least 3 full length tests. Some take only 1 full length. It’s up to you and what you think makes the most sense for your situation. In our study schedule, you’ll take 5 full length tests at the end.

Note: On DAT Bootcamp, the full length tests are the individual subject practice tests 1-10 compiled together, so they’ll have the same questions.

Example: Full length test 2 is made up of biology test 2, general chemistry test 2, organic chemistry test 2, perceptual ability test 2, reading comprehension test 2, quantitative reasoning test 2.

That means if you do biology test 2 from the practice tests section, you will have done the biology portion of full length test 2.

In the study schedule, I recommend you complete tests 1-5 as individual practice tests (ex. Biology test 1) and use tests 6-10 as full length tests. However, that decision is up to you, you know yourself the best and what makes the most sense. Some students take the first 7 tests as individual practice tests, and save the last 3 for their full length DAT simulation, and that’s perfectly fine too. You’re in control and can decide what will help you score the highest on the DAT.